Less than 23 Percent of Adults Get Enough Exercise
Thursday, June 28, 2018 at 5:44AM
Editor

About a quarter of U.S. adults meet guidelines for both aerobic and muscle-strengthening exercise in their spare time, according to new data from the CDC's National Center for Health Statistics.

The US Department of Health and Human Services recommends that people between the ages of 18 and 64 engage in at least 150 minutes of moderate physical activity or 75 minutes of vigorous physical activity each week, as well as muscle-strengthening activities at least twice a week. 
The department's Healthy People 2020 initiative, which kicked off in 2010, had a target goal of 20.1% of adults meeting these guidelines by 2020. The CDC report, published Thursday, reveals that this goal was surpassed; 22.9% meet it.
"That being said, we found that even though the average has met and exceeded the objective or the goal, there are differences," said Tainya Clarke, a health statistician and epidemiologist with the CDC's National Center for Health Statistics and one of the authors of the report. "There are differences at the state level, and there are differences by some sociodemographic factors."
If you live in Colorado, there's a decent chance you've exercised today. 
 
That state had the highest percentage of adults meeting the guidelines, with 32.5% doing so, according to the report. The District of Columbia and 13 other states also significantly surpassed it. Thirteen states, most notably Mississippi at just 13.5%, were significantly lower than the national average.
"Many of the states with the highest percentages of populations meeting the guidelines through leisure-time physical activity were what you'd call 'cold weather states' like Colorado, New Hampshire, Massachusetts," Clarke said. "And usually, we would think the warmer states would have more people outside running or biking or cycling, because that's what we see on TV all the time."
Many of the states that failed to meet the Healthy People 2020 goal were in the Southeast, such as Florida, Georgia and Alabama.
Article originally appeared on The Anderson Observer (http://andersonobserver.com/).
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